Stretching potential

Posts tagged ‘Moluk’

Introducing: Oogi – a funny little figure

After being back from the Nuremberg Toy Fair for a good few weeks I have yet to see a review of Moluk’s latest offering – so here is mine.  Meet the the cutest and most flexible (in many ways) little figure at the fair: Oogi!

Oogi is made of silicon.  He has extra-long arms and his head, hands and feet are little suction cups. When hurled from a distance towards any smooth surface, Oogi grabs hold with his head, a hand or foot, leaving him dangling there like Spiderman. His long arms are also very expressive, and can be tied, crossed, stuck or joined to make this little guy come alive.

Image

Oogi also has friends, and like any little person, the more the merrier.  When Oogi’s friends come to play, the options multiply. By the nature of the design, Oogi likes to hold onto his friends and forms a great play companion to the Bilibo or Bilibo minis.  Oogi is available in red and blue, and in two sizes, Oogi and Oogi Junior.

Image

Here are some of the reasons occupational therapists love Oogi:

  • Great for creative play and imagination;
  • Can be used to talk about and imitate emotions;
  • The silicon is easy for little hands to manipulate.  Tying his arms teaches the starting knot for tying shoes;
  • Throwing Oogi across the room towards a flat surface is great for loosening the shoulders and can be used for over- or under-arm throwing, improving eye-hand coordination;
  • It’s a great unisex figurine – limited only by the limits of the child’s imagination;
  • Safe for a large age-range of children, from toddlers to adults;
  • Great for group play; and
  • A great fidget toy!

One of my favourite activities with him is using Oogi against a mirror to make patterns, learn about left and right and play in the shaving foam.

What are your Oogi-ideas?

Advertisements

Toy Review: Pluï

Image

Due to the nature of the toys that capture the imaginations of children and not necessarily adults, we’ve decided to review some great toys one by one, for the adults that buy them for the kids. Today’s blog post is the first in that series as we review the Pluï.

Pluï is a fun new water toy, perfect for summer as well as bath time.  It’s a hard sphere with bumps, available in blue, yellow and green.  At first I thought it looked a bit like a farm yard animal, maybe a cow or pig.  But on closer inspection it becomes apparent that each little bump has a hole – and that’s where the fun starts!

Image

Pluï makes rain. The name was developed from the french word pluie or rain. All you need to do is hold it under the water until it fills up.  Pick it up using one finger to close off the single hole on the top of the toy.  As you lift your finger to uncover the hole, rain starts to flow from the holes at the bottom of the toy. Persistent rain (until the water runs out).  But this is where the fun comes in – stop the rain, or bob your finger up and down to create lighter drops or even drizzle. And if you have two or three pluï, and some friends, you could really create a downpour in the bath tub! Even tiny hands can manage two at a time.

Some little creative souls started their own version of Händel’s “Water Music”, each with their index finger tapping away at the top hole at a different speed to create their own rhythm as the drops hit the surface of the water. What fun!  You see, moms and dads, it’s not about what the toy looks like to us, or what WE think it “does” or can be used for.  A toy is merely an instrument with which a child’s imagination can be tapped.  It provides a starting point from which they can create their own story.

As a paediatric occupational therapist, I have my own reasons for appreciating the design of Pluï.  I like the size – similar to that of a tennis ball which gets a nice spherical grip with a large web space.  This is something we’re always looking for to encourage strong hands and a good pencil grip later on.  On top of that, I like the way the index (pointer) finger has to control the speed of the water flow.  Individual finger movements are critical for the development of fine motor control and dexterity. If little hands are too tiny to manage that, a toddler can use two hands, one to hold and one to block the hole (great for bilateral integration).  And water play as a medium is a lovely starting point for children with tactile defensiveness.

So whether you’re playing with your Pluï in the bathtub or in the swimming pool, have fun this summer.  But remember – safety always comes first.

Happy Playing!

SZZ

PS Here’s a video of some children playing with Pluï!